Washington State Car Accident Laws

Being involved in a car accident can be a painful, scary, and confusing experience.

It can be difficult to know where to go, who to talk to, and what is required after a car accident in Washington state.

In Yakima, the experienced car accident attorneys at Kapuza Lighty have helped many clients navigate the complex car accident laws to ensure that you have done everything required as well as protect your injury claims.

To learn more about Washington state car accident laws, call or contact our office today to schedule a free consultation of your case.

Q: What are the Reporting Requirements for a Car Accident?

A: According to the Washington State Patrol, anyone involved in a car accident is required by law to report the accident if any of the following instances occur:

  • Damage to a single vehicle or property is estimated at $1,000 or more
  • Any injury or death of a person

This applies to all people potentially involved in an accident, including the driver, passengers, pedestrians, bicyclists, property owner, and anyone else who might be affected by the car accident.

Q: What are the Auto Insurance Requirements in Washington?

A: Washington state mandates that all drivers carry a minimum level of auto insurance when driving in the state. The liability minimums for auto insurance include $25,000 for single person injuries or death, $50,000 for total injuries if more than one person is injured, and $10,000 in property damage coverage.

The state also allows in lieu of minimum auto insurance coverage for a person to apply for a certificate of deposit to guarantee financial responsibility with the state Department of Licensing or provide a liability bond of at least $60,000.

It is important to note that liability coverage covers the cost of damages for others involved in the accident but not for you. Additional coverages like collision coverage, personal injury protection (PIP), and uninsured motorist coverage can provide protection for you if you are involved in an accident with someone who does not or cannot cover the costs of your damages in an accident.

Q: Should I Talk To an Insurance Adjuster?

A: You should be very careful when talking to an insurance adjuster or making a statement about the accident without an attorney.

The insurance companies, including your own, rarely have your best interests in mind when an accident is reported and a claim is made for damages. They want to make the claim go away as fast as possible for as little compensation as possible. Oftentimes, insurers will make an offer immediately for far less than what an injury victim is owed.

A lawyer always has your best interests in mind and serves as a shield between you and the insurance companies. Your attorney will communicate and negotiate with the insurers on your behalf to ensure that you receive full and fair compensation for your case.

Q: How Long Do I Have To File a Lawsuit?

A: Under Washington law, the victim of a car accident has three years from the date of the accident to file a lawsuit for damages. Known as the statute of limitations, if a lawsuit is filed after that date the court can throw it out and bar the victim from collecting any compensation for their injuries from the parties at fault.

Q: What Can I Be Compensated for in a Car Accident Case?

A: Compensation for a car accident case includes damages for economic and noneconomic harm. Economic damages include payment for out of pocket expenses covered by the victim after the accident, including medical bills, lost wages, property damage, and future lost income and benefits.

Noneconomic damages cover the intangible harms like pain and suffering, loss of enjoyment of life, disfigurement, disability, and emotional distress. In the worst case scenarios, when the victim of a car accident dies, the family can also seek additional compensation for wrongful death. This includes payment for reasonable funeral and burial expenses, final medical costs, and the loss of love, security, support, and companionship.

It is important to note that Washington state uses a pure comparative negligence doctrine when it comes to compensation for car accident cases. This means that the court determines the degree of fault for each party involved in the car accident and reduces their overall award by that percentage. For example, if a car accident victim has $50,000 in damages and is found ten percent at fault, the overall award is reduced to $45,000.

Talk To Our Office Now

Call the office or contact us today at Kapuza Lighty in Yakima to learn more about car accident cases and to schedule a free review of your case with one of our knowledgeable personal injury attorneys now.

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